h1

Lucie Aubrac (1997)

Sunday, 18. November 2012

Lucie Aubrac
Director: Claude Berri
Writer: Claude Berri
Based on: Lucie Aubrac‘s book
Cast: Carole Bouquet, Daniel Auteuil, Patrice Chéreau, Eric Boucher, Jean-Roger Milo, Heino Ferch
Part of: Vienna Jewish Film Festival

Plot:
Raymond Aubrac (Daniel Auteuil) is a french resistance fighter in WW2. He’s married to Lucie (Carole Bouquet), who shares his views, even if she isn’t as active in the fight. When Raymond is arrested, Lucie actually succeeds in freeing him by directly threatening an official. Raymond assumes a new identity and continues is work, but then he is again caught, together with a few other resistance fighters. So Lucie tries everything in her power to free him one more time.

I would have liked to enjoy this movie more than I did. But unfortunately, it was pretty boring and it had the worst lead in Carole Bouquet.

Carole Bouquet really was awful. Not only has she an artificial looking face, she enhances that effect by not using any muscles and having no mimic whatsoever. It made watching her almost painful. Though not as painful as having to watch Daniel Auteuil kissing her – they both looked thoroughly disgusted by that. Which didn’t help to sell their love story.

I also was quite surprised by how little this movie is about Lucie. I mean, it’s called Lucie Aubrac, for crying out loud. But the movie sticks to Raymond and his view much more than to Lucie’s, leaving the audience much more involved with him than with her. (Which, considering how bad Bouquet was, was probably a smart choice, but still.)

The pacing was really bad to boot. It was too slow and the direction was incredibly ham-fisted. There’s this scene where the group of resistance fighters get followed by a (female) spy who is so much the opposite of inconspicuous that you can’t help but wonder how Raymond only got arrested twice if he doesn’t even notice spying like that.

At least Daniel Auteuil was good. And the story itself is really interesting. I just wish that we had gotten a movie to tell it that did it justice.

Summarising: forgettable.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 289 other followers

%d bloggers like this: