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Le naufragé [Stranded] (2009) + Un monde sans femmes [A World Without Women] (2011)

Tuesday, 4. December 2012

Le naufragé
Director: Guillaume Brac
Writer: Guillaume Brac
Cast: Vincent Macaigne, Julien Lucas, Adélaïde Leroux

Un monde sans femmes
Director: Guillaume Brac
Writer: Guillaume Brac, Hélène Ruault
Cast: Vincent Macaigne, Laure Calamy, Constance Rousseau, Laurent Papot
Part of: Viennale
Le naufragé is a short film that is a prologue to Un monde sans femmes.

Plot:
In Le naufragé, cyclist Luc (Julien Lucas) is caught with a flat near a small town at the sea. He gets picked up by Sylvain (Vincent Macaigne) who promises to help him, but things take a different turn.
In Un monde sans femmes, Sylvain rents out a holiday apartment to Patricia (Laure Calamy) and her daugher Juliette (Constance Rousseau). Patricia is looking for fun and revels in flirting with the men around her, while Juliette is embarassed by her mom’s behavior. And Sylvain just finds himself caught inbetween.

The reason I have grouped these two movies together like this is that they are basically one movie. They are not only connected by the setting and Sylvain, but also by the atmosphere and the general theme. And I have to say that I liked both a lot.

Guillaume Brac basically tells very quotidian stories without much excitement, but a whole lot of empathy. He tells them calmly, with an excellent script and an even better ensemble. The emotional center is Vincent Macaigne who is perfectly cast as Sylvain and gives him the necessary vulnerability, but also charm to make the role work.

But also both Laure Calamy and Constance Rousseau were really wonderful. Especially Laure Calamy managed to let Patricia’s loneliness shine through her character without having it take over or making her somebody to be pitied. And it was great to see how the script treated them all. For a film that is titled “A World Without Women”, it takes excellent care with them.

But the films are not only about the three of them. Instead it almost feels like a declaration of love to the entire town it was shot in, Ault, and its inhabitants. Which I can completely understand – Ault looks and feels like a wonderful little village that Brac seems to have a special love for and that transports well on screen.

In short, both films entertain and engage without flashes or bangs, instead relying on the strong performances and wonderful characters to give you all the feels.

Summarising: I can recommend it a lot.

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4 comments

  1. Omg, Jude Law is Anna Karenina’s husband!
    You have to watch and review this movie for me. :)


    • I definitely will watch and review it. For you and for myself. (Also, Aaron Johnson is Anna Karenina’s lover!)


  2. Yawp. Now I really want to be Keira Knightley. :)


    • I’d never thought I’d say it, but oh yes…



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